CHES Associates

CHES Associates

Cory Henderson

cory henderson

Advisor: Christina Bergey

Postdoctoral associate, Department of Genetics

Academic biography and research interests:
Dr. Cory Henderson focuses on applying bioinformatic and molecular approaches to understand pathogen transmission on a deeper level and aid in the development of technology to prevent the spread of diseases. His current research aims to understand evolutionary genetics and immunity in human disease vectors, primarily in African Anopheles mosquitos.

For his graduate work, Dr. Henderson studied evolutionary genetics of North American Anopheles, the molecular interactions between Mayaro virus with its aedine and anopheline vectors, as well as the interactions Mayaro virus might have with other co-circulating arboviruses within shared vector species. Currently, Dr. Henderson a postdoctoral researcher with Dr. Christina Bergey and is now investigating genomic integrations in natural and controlled contexts to determine how these integrations initiate piRNA biogenesis and the silencing potential of piRNA expression. He is also working on projects that aim to dissect the evolutionary dynamics of African Anopheles mosquitos in regions where vector borne diseases are endemic, and how these dynamics are influenced by human populations. This work aims to understand vector borne diseases impacting human populations and to aid in the development of methods to limit the spread of such diseases.

Contact information:
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Elise J. Laugier

Laugier profile

ACADEMIC BIOGRAPHY
Dartmouth College: PhD, Ecology, Evolution, Environment, and Society (Anthropology Track), 2021

Dissertation Title: Reconstructing Agro-Pastoral Land Use in the Mesopotamian-Zagros Foothills

RESEARCH INTERESTS
I am an environmental archaeologist interested in the role of agriculture in the emergence and maintenance of cities, states, and empires, particularly in Southwest Asia. My research investigates the complex interplay between past agricultural economies and local environments, focusing on the legacy effects (ecological inheritances) of human landscape modification and the development of new approaches to quantify past land use. My work integrates a variety of approaches ranging from satellite remote sensing to the analysis of microbotanical remains.

Currently, I am a postdoctoral researcher investigating long-term human(urban)-environment relationships in Dr. Dan Cabanes’ ALMA lab. My current research assesses the relationship between soil microbotanicals and remote sensing datasets and well as the potential of phytoliths to investigate the long-term impacts of agricultural land use on semi-arid ecosystems. I am also continuing to build on my previous research using phytoliths to approach long-standing questions about pastoralism in Mesopotamian (ancient Iraq) archaeology.

CONTACT INFORMATION
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SELECTED PUBLICATIONS
Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=UWAGIVAAAAAJ&hl=en

Nicole Torosin

TorosinPostdoctoral Associate, Dept. Genetics

ACADEMIC BIOGRAPHY

University of Utah: PhD Biological Anthropology, 2019
Dissertation title: Genetic variation in toll-like receptor 7 and toll-like receptor 8 in humans and howler monkeys and potential implications for susceptibility to yellow fever virus

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Dr. Nicole Torosin studies evolution using a comparative phylogenetic framework. Her research interests are primate immune genetic evolution, Drosophila genomics, environmental specific evolution, and 3D genome organization.

For her graduate work, Dr. Torosin studied genetic variation in innate immune genes toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 and TLR8 across the primate phylogeny to identify genetic candidates underlying the variable susceptibility of primates to yellow fever virus. She focused on neotropical howler monkeys since they are the most susceptible of all primates to yellow fever virus. Dr. Torosin collected fecal samples from endangered populations in Northern Argentina.

Currently she is a postdoctoral researcher in Dr. Chris Ellison's laboratory in the Department of Genetics here at Rutgers. She now also studies the evolution of 3D genome conformation in Drosophila and how divergence may affect gene expression.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
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website: https://sites.rutgers.edu/nicole-torosin/

 

Hylke de Jong

dejongTeaching Instructor, Anthropology

ACADEMIC BIOGRAPHY

University of Bristol, UK: PhD Archaeology and Anthropology, 2013
Dissertation title: Subsistence plasticity: A strontium isotope perspective on subsistence through intra-tooth enamel and inter-site variation by LA-MC-ICPMS and TIMS
Supervisors: Dr. Alistair Pike, Prof. Dr. Chris Hawkesworth, FRS

Leiden University, the Netherlands: Doctoraal (MA equivalent) Archaeology Indian America; Pre-Columbian Caribbean, 2003.
Thesis title: Strontium isotope analysis (87Sr/86Sr) on enamel and bone from a sample (n=14) of the Pre-Columbian population of Anse à la Gourde, Guadeloupe: a test for matrilocality and a pilot study in provenancing individuals in the Caribbean.
Supervisors: Dr. Menno Hoogland, Prof. Dr. Corinne Hofman, Prof. Dr. Gareth Davies

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS
My studies both at the MA level and at the PhD focused on 87Sr/86Sr analysis on human tissue, though I have looked at other isotopic systems (i.e. δ56Fe for perspectives on metabolism and hence behaviour), and other analytical substrates (e.g. laser ablation strontium in charred seeds, on 87Sr/86Sr variation in Pleistocene orangutan teeth scavenged by Sumatran porcupines, crocodilians). What sustains my curiosity in the application of isotopes to archaeology is how this form of analysis may uncover up to now uncharted aspects of human behaviour, opening new horizons to solve a variety of pertinent questions. Among these I am particularly interested in those concerning subsistence, metabolism and man’s adaptability to the demands of the environment.

CONTACT INFORMATION
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Andrew van Horn

AndrewPostdoctoral Associate, Dept. Anthropology

ACADEMIC BIOGRAPHY

Temple University: PhD Anthropology, 2019
Dissertation title: Quantification and phylogenetic comparative analysis of pelage sexual dichromatism in primates

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Dr. Andrew Van Horn is a biological anthropologist interested in perception, primate evolution, information theory and cooperation.

As a graduate student, Dr. Van Horn studied the evolution of sexual dichromatism in coat color across the order Primates. He identified several species previously considered monochromatic as dichromatic and used phylogenetic comparative analyses to look for evidence of sexual selection on male coat color. This work was done in collaboration with the lab of Dr. Brenda Bradley at The George Washington University. As a postdoc at the University of Houston, he studied the evolution of information content in indigenous artworks.

Currently Dr. Van Horn is a postdoctoral researcher working with the Human Generosity Project in Dr. Lee Cronk's laboratory. His research there focuses on mutual aid as a strategy for managing unpredictable resource availability and health-related adversity in contemporary US communities.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

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website: andrewvanhorn.wordpress.com